Photo by Timothy Eberly on Unsplash

The Lost Art of the Private Moment

On what it means to be connected.

Lance Baker
7 min readDec 12, 2022

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A farmer and his friend sat under the shade of a fruit tree, watching as the sun began to set over the fields. They had been working hard all day, tending to the crops and animals, and were taking a well-deserved break. As they sat together, they could hear the gentle rustling of the leaves in the breeze, and the distant chirping of birds as they settled in for the night. It was the end of another long day, but there was a sense of peace and contentment in the air.

“It’s been a good long day,” started the farmer. “I appreciate you coming over to give me a hand. It seems every day I’m constantly trying to find ways to improve things around here to make things more efficient and a bit easier. Today was one of the few days where it seemed everything went right. I spent more time building and creating than mending and fixing.”

“Always a pleasure” the friend said with a wry smile, “You know, it’s interesting how you’re always looking for ways to improve things, but there are always people out there who romanticize the olden days and want to go back to the way things were. They talk about the simplicity and the charm of the past, but I think they forget about all the hard work and struggles that came with it.”

The farmer nodded in agreement. “Yes, I’ve noticed that as well,” he said. “It seems like people often gravitate towards the opposite of what they have. When they have a lot, they want to simplify. And when they have little, they want to acquire. I never quite understood that phenomenon.”

The friend shrugged. “I think it’s just human nature to want what you don’t have. We never seem to be completely satisfied either way. I suppose people gravitate towards the opposite of what they have simply to experience something different.”

“It is ironic isn’t it?’ the farmer said with a chuckle. “It feels like the obvious answer is to learn to be content with what we have and be grounded in what is in front of us. But isn’t it the drive for what we don’t have that leads to innovation, creativity, and progress? If we were just content with things as they were, why would anyone change or do anything at all?”

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Lance Baker

A fellow observer on the journey through life. Trying to cultivate a deeper way of being in the world.